Sunday, February 22, 2009

Putting a period on the end of that sentence

On Saturday I drove to my old office for the last time. Unfortunately, when the company I used to work for conducts a separation they do so in a manner that shows no respect, no matter the time you spent with the company or successes you brought through your role, or the relationships built over time, and most importantly how well they know you. You are immediately an outsider. I'd seen it before and always cringed. It's not having to get my things during off hours, and it's not returning the keys and all those details, it's the watch. It's the HR Manager hovering as if I would do damage or take something not mine. For me though the real moment of shock was realizing the irony and absolute lack of good judgement when I was asked for the near-completed next issue of People First, the quarterly internal newsletter that I wrote for the company. I was told they want to get that distributed. I considered saying something but didn't feel it was my place to suggest that even though they are completely within their rights, perhaps distributing that particular issue was not a good idea as most folks know I am the writer and know my writing style. Plus, the darn thing is so upbeat and positive that, all things considered, it sends a weird message at this point. Seems to me it will further damage an already sinking employee moral. But, not my decision to make.

I kept a smile on my face and a friendly tone in my voice while I packed boxes under the watchful eye of the HR Manager. I sorted files and I turned in my final expense receipts. I took my diploma from the wall and one-by-one the framed photos. I packed my reference books and other items that I'd collected through the years, leaving behind the ones with the company logo. I sorted my project files. Then I explained the status of each project to my old boss while a kind long-time coworker who showed up to give support to me loaded all of my items and the furniture I had at the office into his truck. With the task wrapped up, it was time to go. And what I did was extend my smile a bit wider, held my head a bit higher, and wished my old boss and the HR Manager the best of luck, and told them that I wished for their and the company's continued success. Then I walked out of that office for the last time.

6 comments:

Leap Of Faith said...

Good girl, Alison! My brother says, always leave them realizing what a huge mistake they just made by the tilt of your chin, the width of your smile, and the way your shoulders suggest you can't WAIT to find out what's next!

I can't wait to find out either. :-)

CreekHiker said...

I will say, as hard as it is to FIND a job right now, when this has happened to me in the past, IT ALWAYS LED TO SOMETHING WAY BETTER! Sometimes, we can't see that we NEED out and the universe does it for us.

You handled this with class and your next employer will be so lucky!

ghost said...

i would have burned a bridge for sure.

Soulful said...

You go girl.

Velvet Sacks said...

You showed grace and class. I wouldn't have expected anything else from you. Way to go, Alison.

donnaf said...

Way to go, Ali-son! I'm so proud of and I know how hard that was. It's hard to do - but you are such a better person for it!